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Category: childrens’ rights

Child Killed in Tragic Theme Park Crash

Child Killed in Tragic Theme Park Crash

It has been reported that a child has died in an accident at Drayton Manor theme park in Staffordshire.

The 11-year-old schoolgirl was on a trip with classmates when she fell from the Splash Canyon ride at the theme park.

Police and HSE have launched an investigation into how such a tragic accident could occur.

A spokesperson from Personal Injury Lawyers Cardiff has commented, “Incidents like this are tragic and although theme parks have many safety provisions in place, sadly accidents like this do happen.”

This incident follows other high profile theme park accidents such as the accident on The Smiler ride at Alton Towers. In this accident, 16 people were left suspended in the air and 4 people were left seriously injured. One of the girls involved had her leg amputated following the accident.

Theme parks have high safety standards, but recent incidents have shown that tragic accidents can happen.

Child Injured at School

Child Injured at School

playgroundEvery parent sends their child off to school hoping that their child will be well looked after and kept safe through out the day.

When a teacher or other school employee looks after your child they are said to be acting ‘in loco parentis.’ This is a latin term which translated as ‘in place of a parent.’

There are an endless list of circumstances under which a child can be injured at school. They may suffered a slip, trip or fall in the playground due to a spillage that has failed to be attended to or a hazard such as unsafe flooring which has not been rectified.

Accidents can of course happen anywhere and at any time, but if the school failed to take reasonable precautions to make the space safe for the children, they may be held liable for injuries that occur on school grounds.

When someone has been injured in an accident it is natural to wonder how much compensation the injured party may be entitled to. This can be a very difficult question to answer as there are so many different factors which can contribute to the settlement that an injured party is awarded. You can find out more information about how to make a claim and how much you may be able to claim from a personal injury expert.

Forced Marriage of Children

Forced Marriage of Children

Forced marriage of children is a huge problem across the world and even within the UK.

The International Research Centre on Womens’ Rights has estimated that 33% of girls in the developing world are married before the the age of 18.  Child marriage is most common in Sub-Saharan and Western Africa as well as Asia.

Child marriage creates many problems. It removes girls from their homes, families and communities at a young age. This can leave them in a vulnerable position and at risk of harm and abuse. It can also interupt their schooling and reduces their ability to enter the workforce. The effects of child marriage can be devastating for boys as well as girls.

UK law, and international law, makes it very clear that forced marriage of children is a fundemental restriction of their human rights. Article 16(2) of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (UDHR) stipulates that: Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.

At such a young age, it is impossible for children to consent to a marriage.

UNICEF have also reported that marriage of children is most prevalent within the most deprived communities.

Astoundingly, child marriage occurs within the UK. The UK Government set up the Forced Marriage Unit (FMU) to tackle these issues and help to protect children. Legislation has also been brought into force to help prevent forced marriages of vulnerable people, known as Forced Marrriage Protection Orders.

Anyone effected by these issues can contact a family or child rights lawyer for assistance.

Supreme Court Rules Against Child Protection Law

Supreme Court Rules Against Child Protection Law

The SNP’s controversial Named Person Scheme has been ruled unlawful by the UK’s Supreme Court.
The Scottish National Party introduced this policy with the aims of giving every child in Scotland a ‘named person’ who would be available to help and advise the child. The Scottish government argued that having designated person would help families address problems before they became more serious.

Child Rights Net - family

The named person would also act as a liaison between the family and government services such as the health service, bereavement counseling and speech and language services.
However, many people have argued that the Named Person Scheme is an unnecessary state intrusion into private family lives and may even be incompatible with EU law.
Since the scheme was announced, many bodies have voiced concerns with the policy, and the campaign group No to Named Person was set up. This organisation argues that the scheme will intrude upon parent’s responsibilities and decision making for their own children.
Their main concerns include undermining family privacy; the fact the scheme is compulsory for every child in Scotland and that the scheme facilitate state intervention when there is no risk of harm only concerns about a child’s “happiness”.
The UK Supreme Court ruled that aspects of the scheme were incompatible with EU law. The ways of sharing information between named persons and other bodies were ruled unlawful.
However, despite the ruling, this is not necessarily the end for the Named Person Scheme. The Scottish Government have vowed to start work on addressing the non-compliant aspects of the scheme so that the policy can be introduced.

Child Rights Updates to Come

Child Rights Updates to Come

Child Rights Net brings you the latest legal news and updates on how children’s rights are being protected in law across the world. We also provide commentary on women and mother’s rights.

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All human rights apply to children as they would to adults, but special legislation has been created to protect the rights of children. The foundation stone of children’s rights throughout the world is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. This is also known as the UNCRC. This is an international charter that sets out the human rights that every child must have protected in law. To date, 194 countries have signed up to the UNCRC, making it one of the most ratified conventions in the world.

There are many organisations which work to facilitate the rights set out in the UNCRC. These include governmental organisations such as UNICEF and NGOs such as Save the Children and Child Rights International Network (CRIN). These bodies work to promote children’s rights, research the application of children’s rights and improve the living conditions of children and mothers throughout the world.

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We will be bringing you news and updates on the work of these organisations and on how children and mothers’ rights are being applied in countries throughout the world.